Ten Surprising Attractions in Northern Idaho

Sometimes a lesser-known attraction ends up being a diamond in the rough.  We’ve listed some off-the-beaten-path Idaho favorites that deserve a look.  From chapels to memorials, wildlife to railways and hops to history, these special places contribute greatly to the fabric and experiences of northern Idaho.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

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Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge.
Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge.

Wildlife enthusiasts or bird watchers shouldn’t miss a visit to the Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge near Bonners Ferry.  The refuge hosts more than 230 species of birds, 45 species of mammals, 22 species of fish and more scenery than can be absorbed in a day. The refuge lies along the Pacific Flyway, attracting tens of thousands of migrating ducks, geese and swans each fall. With luck, one may spot big game such as elk, deer, bear or moose. The refuge also has a system of foot trails, including Myrtle Falls trail. This well-maintained trail is winding and steep but the view of the falls makes the hike worthwhile. Also in the area, the McArthur Lake and Boundary Creek Wildlife Management Areas offer more wildlife viewing opportunities.

Mission of the Sacred Heart.
Mission of the Sacred Heart.

Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park in Cataldo is home to the oldest building in Idaho. The Mission of the Sacred Heart, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was constructed between 1850 and 1853 by Catholic missionaries and members of the Coeur d’ Alene Tribe. Guests may also see the restored Parish House and historic cemetery. The world-class Sacred Encounters Exhibit includes artifacts from the Smithsonian and Museum of Natural History and tells the story of how Jesuit missionaries came to the interior Northwest at the invitation of the Coeur d’ Alene and Salish tribes and the profound effects this sacred encounter had on both cultures.

 

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

The Bird Aviation Museum and Invention Center in Sagle showcases the contributions of aviators and innovators who have helped create modern technology and celebrates those individuals who have forever changed the way we live. The museum was founded by Dr. Forrest Bird, inventor of the medical respirator, and his wife Pam in 2007. Allow plenty of time to see Dr. Bird’s personal collection of aircraft, invention displays, and flight exhibits. Be inspired! It only takes one person to change the world.

A train funneled through Sandpoint follows the lakeshore.
A train funneled through Sandpoint follows the lakeshore.

Sandpoint Rail Funnel.  Sandpoint has the great honor to be the site where the east and westbound railways in the northern states converge, better known as a railway funnel. For train-spotters and railfans, Sandpoint is the place to be with more than 50 trains chugging through town daily. Railfans from around the world travel to Sandpoint to watch and photograph the trains, some more than a mile in length, as they traverse the bridge over Lake Pend Oreille and through the forested mountains.

Sunshine Mine Disaster Memorial
Sunshine Mine Disaster Memorial

To learn about northern

Idaho’s mining history, head to the towns of Wallace and Kellogg. The Wallace District Mining Museum’s artifacts, models, photographs, paintings and displays of mining activity and techniques take you back in time and deep into the history of one of the most lucrative mining districts in the country.  In Kellogg, the Shoshone County Mining & Smelting Museum or (Staff House Museum)  occupies a two-story American-revival style house constructed in 1906 for a mining company executive. It has 12 rooms of exhibits, a gift shop and outdoor displays including a 73.5 ton Nordberg air compressor. Learn about the human cost of extracting the earth’s riches with a visit to the Sunshine Mine Disaster Memorial in Kellogg.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Scenic Hiking Trails.  With the breathtaking scenery around Sandpoint, we are most fortunate to have hiking trails that offer access to some exceptional vistas. Bring a camera when hiking these two trails.

Mineral Point Interpretive Trail contours along Lake Pend Oreille about 14 miles south of Sandpoint near Garfield Bay with magnificent views across the lake to the Green Monarch Mountains. View the map and details at Forest Service Mineral Point Trail No. 82.

Views of the Green Monarch Mountains.
View of the Green Monarch Mountains.

One of the closest and nicest hikes adjacent to Sandpoint, the Mickinnick Trail is a challenging trail that rises more than 2,000 feet in its 3.5-mile length (seven miles round-trip). The workout is worth it, affording splendid views as you climb through big granite features ending at a rocky knob commanding a view of Sandpoint, the Long Bridge, the Cabinet Mountains, and Lake Pend Oreille. Click to see the Forest Service map and elevation profile.

Bonner County Historical Museum.
Bonner County Historical Museum.

The Bonner County Historical Museum in Sandpoint has numerous displays including Native American artifacts, an extensive collection of Ross Hall photos, a pioneer kitchen and more. Exhibits tell the story of the longest residents of Bonner County – the Kalispell and Kootenai people – and how early residents interacted with the landscape to make a living at farming, logging, and mining.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Elk Mountain Farms north of Bonners Ferry grows hops for parent company Anheuser-Busch. The intricate system of poles and trellises is impressive, as are the vines that grow 20 feet tall. Harvest is in late August to early September. To view the field, drive north on Highway 95 to Highway 1 and turn left on Copeland Road. Drive to the Westside Road and go south for outstanding views overlooking the fields. The operation can also be seen from Porthill.

The Panida Theater.
The Panida Theater.

Sandpoint’s historic performing arts center, the Spanish Mission style Panida Theater, has a rich winter season filled with concerts, plays, fine art films, and events. The Panida opened as a vaudeville and movie house in 1927 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Then, as now, its name reflected its mission: to showcase great performers and performances for audiences of the PANhandle of Idaho.

Discover the fascinating history of the Coeur d’Alene region at the Museum of North Idaho, located at the front of Coeur d’Alene’s City Park. Exhibits explore steamboats, railroads, communities, recreation, the U.S. Forest Service, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Farragut Naval Training Station, and the Ice Age Flood. Guests may also visit the Fort Sherman Chapel.  Built in 1880 by the U.S. Army, the chapel is Coeur d’Alene’s oldest church, school, library and meeting hall. Scheduled historic walking tours of Fort Sherman Chapel depart from the Museum.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc

1616 E Seltice Way | Post Falls | ID | 83854

Original Article Appeared on VisitIdaho.Org

 

 

Posted on October 8, 2019 at 4:16 am
Scott Shepard | Category: Coeur d'Alene History, Idaho Fun Facts, Idaho History, Northern Idaho Destinations | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Northern Idaho Waterfront – New Site For All North Idaho Waterfront Properties

Experience all of the beauty Northern Idaho has to offer! One of the premier vacation destinations in the US, North Idaho is attracting tourists from all parts of the world looking to vacation among the vast trees, lakes, rivers, and wildlife. Because of this, right now is the perfect time to invest in in-demand, waterfront property.

Our team is excited to launch NorthIdahoWaterfront.com, an easy to use site featuring premier waterfront properties. Updated by the official Realtor®’s database every 5 minutes.  NorthIdahoWaterfront.com features the best lakefront, river frontage properties and waterfront lots available in Northern Idaho. It is the only site you will ever need!  You can save searches, and get daily email alerts of new listings, price changes, sold data, and market reports. Our Interactive Map Search allows you to view properties on a map or refine your search by drawing the boundaries around the area you desire.

—– Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Once you find your utopia, please allow us to help you with the next steps.  You will have a hand-selected team of all-star agents, with years of experience, that will represent you on your waterfront purchase. Behind our talented team is Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc.  Proud to have received numerous awards over the years including the Northwest Business Journal’s “Best Of” Real Estate Office awards for the last 8 years!

In addition, when you work with our team, you help make an impact in children’s lives!  Every time you complete a transaction with Windermere, we make a donation to the Windermere Foundation.

Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc., and Windermere Hayden, LLC have made a sincere commitment to improving the lives of children, families, and neighbors in crisis through their volunteerism, monetary gifts, and the Windermere Foundation.

Thank you for visiting NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

 

 

 

Posted on October 6, 2019 at 5:23 pm
Scott Shepard | Category: Coeur d'Alene, North Idaho Waterfront, Northern Idaho Destinations, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

15 Things You Might Not Know About Idaho

1. Idaho’s known for its potatoes, but its official nickname is the Gem State. Some 72 different precious and semi-precious gemstones have been found there.

2. One of them is the star garnet. It’s only found in abundance in two places in the world: Idaho and India.

3. Idaho also supplies the majority of the nation’s trout.

Idaho

Welcome to Idaho

4. Wondering how the state got its name? So are its residents, as a number of sources claim the name’s provenance. Lobbyist George Willing alleged Idaho meant “gem of the mountains” or “the sun comes from the mountains” in the Shoshone language. Others said the name came from the Apache word “ídaahę́,” meaning enemy, or a Nez Perce phrase that translates to “land of many waters.” Willing eventually copped that he totally made up the word “Idaho.”

5. In 1861, Idaho wasn’t even called Idaho. Originally, Congress dubbed the land the Colorado Territory. Idaho finally became a territory all its own in 1863 and became the 43rd state in 1890.

6. The state horse, the Appaloosa, was brought over by the Spaniards in the 1700s and embraced by the Nez Perce tribe. Settlers called the spotted equines “Palouse horses” after the Palouse River, and the name stuck.

7. At 7,993 feet deep, Hells Canyon in western Idaho is the deepest river gorge in North America. In comparison, the Grand Canyon is only 6,000 feet deep.

Thinking of moving to Idaho?  Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty

8. Thirteen U.S. states are split into two time zones, and Idaho’s one of them. The majority of the state’s area and population fall under Mountain Time. The area above the Salmon River is part of the Pacific Time Zone.

9. Idaho’s state seal is the only one in the U.S. designed by a woman. Emma Edwards Green entered a statewide competition for the honor in 1891 by using only her initials.

10. Also impressive: Idaho’s State Capitol Building is the only one in the U.S. heated by geothermal energy. The heat comes from hot springs located 3,000 feet underground.

11. Idaho’s most famous crop (the potato) isn’t native to the area. The first potato in America was actually planted in New Hampshire, in 1719. A missionary named Henry Harmon Spalding brought the potato to Lapwai, Idaho, in 1836 to teach the Nez Perce tribe how to grow their own food. They were the first to cultivate and sell spuds in the area.

12. If you’re curious whether someone’s from Idaho, try asking him or her to pronounce “Boise.” Natives and longtime residents tend to pronounce it “boy-see,” while outsiders usually say “boy-zee.”

Thinking of moving to Idaho?  Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty

13. Firefighters call this axe-like tool a Pulaski, after the Idahoan forest ranger who popularized it. Edward Pulaski was a hero of the Great Idaho Fire of 1910, which spanned three million acres, killed 87 people, and remains the largest wildfire in U.S. history. He led 45 firefighters to an abandoned prospect mine and fought off the flames at its mouth until he passed out, saving all but five men. A year after the disaster, Pulaski combined an axe and an adze to create the perfect tool for building firebreaks.

14. If you’re dog tired and traveling through Cottonwood, Idaho, you can spend the night at Dog Bark Park Inn, a bed and breakfast shaped like a giant beagle.

15. Or, here’s an even bigger adventure: Sail from the Pacific Ocean to Idaho (or vice-versa) via the Snake and Columbia Rivers. You’ll finish (or start) in Lewiston, the farthest inland port on the west coast.

Thinking of moving to Idaho?  Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty

Original article by Amanda Green

Posted on September 16, 2019 at 9:02 pm
Scott Shepard | Category: Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Fun Facts | Tagged , , , , ,

12 places to go and things to do around Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

At the southern end of the Idaho Panhandle near the Washington Border, Coeur d’Alene is a scenic city filled with fun things to do. The city’s most defining feature is the massive Lake Coeur d’Alene backdropping the downtown district to the south. Waterfront attractions like Tubbs Hill and Coeur D’Alene City Park are located here, and popular recreational activities surrounding the lake include hiking trails, camping, fishing, and boating.

Ready to move to Coeur d’Alene – Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com 

A favorite spot for cycling and hiking, the 23-mile North Idaho Centennial Trail passes by the Lake Coeur d’Alene shoreline and through the family favorite McEuen Park. Other family favorites in Coeur d’Alene include the North Idaho Museum and Mineral Ridge Scenic Area. For more outdoor recreation, the Panhandle encompassing Coeur d’Alene includes national forests, state parks, and year-round mountain resorts. Plan your trip with our list of the top things to do in Coeur d’Alene.

1. Lake Couer d’Alene

Lake Coeur d'Alene

Lake Coeur d’Alene – www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Creating a beautiful backdrop for the city, Lake Coeur d’Alene is one of the largest natural bodies of water in Idaho. Campgrounds, hiking trails, and beaches line the shores of the 25-mile lake, and popular activities atop the water include jet skiing, fishing, kite surfing, and launching a watercraft at one of twelve public boat launches. Abutting the city, the north side of the lake is the most developed for tourists, with spots near the water like McEuen Park and The Coeur d’Alene Resort.

Simply looking out over the water from the beach at Coeur d’Alene City Park adds to the experience of visiting the city, especially when seaplanes land near the shore. A great wildlife spectacle occurs every winter on the lake when hundreds of bald eagles fly in to feed on spawning kokanee salmon, making for a great photo opportunity and reason to visit. For those looking to get on the water themselves, nearly every type of watercraft can be rented from surrounding marinas and concessionaires, as well as a variety of chartered fishing experiences.

2. McEuen Park

Avista Pavilion at McEuen Park

Avista Pavilion at McEuen Park | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

A centerpiece public space for the city, McEuen Park is the perfect place for the entire family to spend the day. Home to the city’s largest playground, McEuen Park also features basketball courts, impressive pavilions, and a leash-free dog park.

Public art lines the bike trails and pedestrian paths that cross through the abundant green space of the park, and a beautiful grand plaza area with landscaped waterfalls, garden beds, and a Veterans Memorial facilitates peaceful time during the day.

The trailhead for Tubbs Hill can be found at the southwest corner of the park next to the water, and the adjacent Harbor House provides summer-fun concessions and seating with a view.

Ready to move to Coeur d’Alene – Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com 

3. North Idaho Centennial Trail

North Idaho Centennial Trail

North Idaho Centennial Trail | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Stretching from the Idaho/Washington Border to Higgins Point on the eastern shores of Lake Coeur d’Alene, the North Idaho Centennial Trail is a 23-mile pedestrian path that takes in some of the best sights of the region. Bicycling is a popular way to navigate the trail, and pedestrians are also commonly seen sharing the pavement.

Originally a railroad line, scenic stops on the Centennial Trail include Heyburn State Park, McEuen Park, and Mineral Ridge Scenic Area. Across state borders into Washington, the trail connects with the Spokane River Centennial Trail, which extends to some of Spokane’s top attractions including Riverside Park.

4. Tubbs Hill

Tubbs Hill

Tubbs Hill | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Near downtown and adjacent to McEuen Park, Tubbs Hill is a publicly owned natural space featuring elevation and overlooks of Lake Coeur d’Alene. Miles of hiking trails stretch up and around Tubbs Hill including a 2.2-mile lakeside interpretive loop, which circles the hill.

Great for anytime-of-the-year nature walks and bald eagle viewing in the winter, Tubbs Hill is a popular outing for families, trail runners, and photography enthusiasts. Tubbs Hill can be accessed via different trailheads from surrounding city streets, and the trailhead on the southwest side of McEuen Park and Third Street features public restrooms and concessions.

Ready to move to Coeur d’Alene – Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com 

5. Mineral Ridge Scenic Area and National Recreation TrailEditor’s Pick

Mineral Ridge View of Lake Coeur d'Alene

Mineral Ridge View of Lake Coeur d’Alene | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

East of the city center and overlooking Beauty Bay and Lake Coeur d’Alene, Mineral Ridge is a historic, scenic area and home to a 3.3-mile national recreation trail. Starting from the paved parking area and picnic shelters of the trailhead, the trail consistently ascends and switchbacks up Mineral Ridge. Interpretive markers along the trail correspond with a guidebook published by the Bureau of Land Management that details the flora, fauna, and history of this early developed recreation site.

The view overlooking Lake Coeur d’Alene atop Mineral Ridge is well worth the moderate effort, and come winter, the ridgeline is a popular place to spot the hundreds of migrating bald eagles making their way through the area.

Address: 9200 ID-97, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Official site: https://www.blm.gov/visit/mineral-ridge-scenic-area-and-national-recreation-trail

6. Downtown Coeur d’Alene

Downtown Coeur d'Alene

Downtown Coeur d’Alene | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

With shopping, dining, and live entertainment, something is always happening on the streets of downtown Coeur d’Alene. Backdropped by a beautiful waterfront area, the downtown area has over 100 retail stores, including specialty boutiques, fine art galleries, and antique shops for special treasures.

Ready to move to Coeur d’Alene – Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com 

Dining can be enjoyed throughout the day in downtown, starting with breakfast spots like The Garnet Cafe and ending with Beverly’s for fine dining in the evening. Community celebrations that take place in the downtown district include holiday lighting events, festive parades, and a weekly Farmers Market throughout the warmer months of the year.

Official site: http://www.cdadowntown.com/

7. Coeur d’Alene City Park

Coeur d'Alene City Park

Coeur d’Alene City Park | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

On the waterfront west of downtown, Coeur d’Alene City Park features 16 acres of beach and landscaped green space complete with an inviting playground. An easy way to connect with the surrounding scenic environment, a cement promenade separating the beach and green space is lined with trees and is great for afternoon strolls. From the beach area, passing boats on the lake add to the attractive backdrop, as do the seaplanes that touch down on the water.

The historically-themed and recently renovated Fort Sherman Playground is a big hit within the city park for young children and parents alike. A center for community attractions and events, Coeur d’Alene City Park holds a variety of engagements throughout the year, including movies in the park and live music in the bandshell. Nearly connected to the park a block away, the historic Fort Sherman Chapel is the oldest church in Coeur d’Alene and is accessed with a short and scenic walk through a charming neighborhood.

8. Silver Mountain Resort

Mountain biking at Silver Mountain

Mountain biking at Silver Mountain | Justin Brockie / photo modified

Forty minutes east of Coeur d’Alene, Silver Mountain Resort is a family-friendly getaway featuring skiing, mountain biking, and year-round retreats into nature. Over 70 named ski routes define much of the winter fun at Silver Mountain, and other cold-weather attractions include winter festivals, day camps, and North America’s longest gondola.

Lift-accessed mountain biking and hiking trails provide miles of fun things to do during the warmer months of the year. Tee-times are recommended at the adjacent Galena Ridge Golf Course, and the indoor Silver Rapids Waterpark at the resort appeals to young swimmers throughout the year.

Address: 610 Bunker Avenue, Kellogg, Idaho

Official Site: www.silvermt.com

9. Museum of North Idaho

Museum of North Idaho

Museum of North Idaho | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Adjacent to Coeur d’Alene City Park and the downtown district, the Museum of North Idaho presents multimedia exhibits covering the history of the Coeur d’Alene region. From railroads to recreation and including logging history and artifacts of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, every aspect of Coeur d’Alene is on display at the museum. Photos and information about the 1941 Playland Pier and 1958 introduction of Hydroplane Races on Lake Coeur D’Alene are particularly interesting permanent exhibits.

A museum store offers a great selection of local-history publications and handmade jewelry and crafts. Free admission is offered to the museum during the city’s Art Walk on the second Friday of each month.

Ready to move to Coeur d’Alene – Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com 

Address: 115 Northwest Boulevard, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Official site: http://www.museumni.org/

10. Coeur d’Alene National Forest

Coeur d'Alene National Forest

Coeur d’Alene National Forest | D. Taylor in Idaho / photo modified

Encompassing the large swath of forest directly east of the city, Coeur d’Alene National Forest is part of the larger Idaho Panhandle National Forest, which covers 2.5-million acres of land between Idaho, Washington, and Montana. Numerous recreational activities stem from the forest land throughout the year, including miles of multi-use trails; rustic campgrounds; freshwater lakes; and opportunities to fish, hunt, and experience nature. One of the most popular recreation spots of the forest accessed from Coeur d’Alene, Hayden Lake is reached via a 20-mile drive from the city.

Remote spots within the forest like the Little Guard Lookout rental cabin enable unique overnight experiences, and popular developed areas to spend the night include the Honeysuckle and Bumblebee Campgrounds. Come winter, the landscape of the national forest lends to snowmobile and cross-country skiing adventures. The entirety of the Panhandle National Forest can take a lifetime to explore, and other areas of high interest include Priest Lake farther north and the St. Joe River area south of the city.

Official site: https://www.fs.usda.gov/ipnf

11. Farragut State Park

Disc golf basket at Farragut State Park

Disc golf basket at Farragut State Park | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Forty minutes north of Coeur d’Alene on the southern tip of Lake Pend Oreille, the largest lake in Idaho, Farragut State Park is a sprawling natural space nestled within the Coeur d’Alene Mountains of north Idaho. Hikers, cyclists, and horse riders use the miles of trails that span throughout the park, and water enthusiasts often utilize the boat launch and Beaver Bay Beach swimming access.

The park is also a well-known disc golf destination, with four professional 18-hole courses spread throughout the forest and meadows of the park, as well as one beginner-friendly nine-hole course. As one of the best campgrounds in Idaho, Farragut State Park offers over 200 sites, including access to shower houses and modern restrooms.

Address: 13550 ID-54, Athol, Idaho

12. Falls Park

Falls Park

Falls Park | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Ten miles west of Coeur d’Alene, Falls Park is a family-friendly and universally accessible play area. This popular city park is based around the Post Falls Dam, which helps regulate water levels in nearby Lake Coeur d’Alene. Alongside viewing platforms of the various hydrodynamics, Falls Park also features a large playground area including an ADA-compliant swing.

Ready to move to Coeur d’Alene – Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com 

The half-acre children’s fishing pond is also popular at the park and features accessible fishing bridges, shoreline, and platforms. Other nature trails in the park and interpretive information make Falls Park a fun destination or detour for a day.

This article originally appeared on Planetware.com

Posted on August 25, 2019 at 1:40 am
Scott Shepard | Category: Coeur d'Alene, North Idaho Waterfront, Northern Idaho Destinations | Tagged , , , , , , ,