Are you interested in fly fishing in North Idaho but need to learn the basics?

Are you interested in fly fishing in North Idaho but need to learn the basics? I found a great YouTube channel through Mad River Outfitters – taught by Brian Flechsig of Mad River Outfitters. This series is sure to get you out on the water and fishing in no time!


Posted on May 23, 2020 at 4:03 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in North Idaho Outdoor Activities |

Are you interested in getting your license to hunt in North Idaho?

Are you interested in getting your license to hunt in North Idaho?

You can start here by taking your hunter’s education course online.

How do I get my Idaho Hunter Education Certificate?

1. Study and pass the Idaho Department of Fish and Game–
Approved online course. Study and pass the $24.50 course. Throughout the Idaho Hunter Ed Course, you’ll be tested on what you’ve learned.

2. Print your Hunter Education Certificate. After successfully completing the online course, you’ll be able to immediately print out your Hunter Education Certificate.

3. Get your Hunter Education Certificate. You’ll be mailed your permanent Hunter Education Certificate by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

GET STARTED CLICK HERE >>> https://hunter-ed.com/idaho/

IDAHO FISH AND GAME – https://idfg.idaho.gov/


Posted on May 23, 2020 at 4:00 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in North Idaho Outdoor Activities |

Bicycling In North Idaho

There is so much to do in North Idaho in the Spring and Summer:  From hiking, fly-fishing, kayaking, hunting, boating, rock climbing, etc.  One of the most popular is biking.

Click on the link below for some terrific bike rides, including a pair of rail-to-trail rides among the best in the nation: the 70-mile Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes, and the amazing Route of the Hiawatha with 10 tunnels and 7 high trestles.

However busy you want to be with outdoor entertainment, the options are endless.

Click Here For The Many Bicycling Options

 


Posted on May 5, 2020 at 4:04 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in North Idaho Outdoor Activities, Uncategorized |

North Idaho Hiking Resources

Tubbs HillWant to take a stroll, or a vigorous hike, or a multi-day backpack deep into the wilderness? You can do that in North Idaho – many times over. There are literally hundreds of hikes and walks on maintained trails in our community parks, national and state forests and backcountry lands. Click below for some of the favorite walks and hikes in our region, with the details you need to go do them, now! For even more trails, go to the Idaho Panhandle National Forest hiking page.

Idaho Forest Services – Hiking Resource

Hiking North Idaho

Idaho Real Estate

 

 

 


Posted on November 22, 2019 at 4:43 am
Scott Shepard | Posted in North Idaho Outdoor Activities, Northern Idaho Destinations |

Five Reasons Why I Love Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

1) NATURE IS AT YOUR DOORSTEP

The outdoor beauty of Northern Idaho is unrivaled. Whether you feel like biking through the mountains on an old train track on the CDA Resort - Public Beach Photoshoot (53)Hiawatha Trail, water skiing across the many beautiful bays of Lake CDA, or simply strolling along the lakeside, riverside, or forest paths in and around town, you’re spoilt for choice. It’s hard not to become a fitness enthusiast here, and it definitely doesn’t require a gym membership. My preferred activities are simple – trail running, lakeside yoga, and maybe a kayak or SUP session if the weather is balmy.

One other bit I love about Coeur d’Alene that you won’t find in the more populated areas of the Northwest: when you’re out hiking or exploring, you’ll see some people (which makes me feel safe and reminds me of that nice sense of community and outdoor camaraderie) but not too many (so you can still enjoy your peace and quiet). I love that there isn’t overcrowding going on yet.

For North Idaho Waterfront properties, visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

2) FOUR BEAUTIFUL SEASONS GIVE YOU A VARIETY OF ACTIVITIES YEAR-ROUND

RESORT OUTDOOR WINTER FAMILY PHOTOSHOOT (16)Yes, I’ve gushed about the beautiful seasons here in Coeur d’Alene. Spring, summer, winter, fall…there’s something so special about each and every one of them. I’d have to say personally, summer and fall have tied for my favorites. Summer gifts us with long days, an abundance of local (wild) fruits and veggies ripe for the picking, and the heat needed for a lot of water-based activities. Fall, however, brings with it the most delightful array of colors, a crisp bite in the air that I adore, and the intrigue of snow-to-come. It also quiets down in town, as the summertime crowds have dispersed to their respective homelands.

You’ll find so many reasons to visit Coeur d’Alene, any time of the year. You really can’t go wrong! If you like snow sports, definitely visit us in winter, as there is an abundance of local ski resorts to enjoy.

For North Idaho Waterfront properties, visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

3) THE ARTISAN COFFEE (AND LOCAL BEER, WINE, ETC.) SCENE IS DARN GOOD

I’ve been a foodie ever since I went to college, but what that means to me has changed quite a bit every time I come home. A dedicated locavore, I love that Coeur d’Alene brings locally-roasted coffee, locally-made beer and wine, and other locally-sourced favorites (like fresh-baked bread and CSA boxes) to the table. It’s really easy to enjoy a good cup of java here (check out Fine Brewed or Coeur d’Alene Coffee Company downtown, or if you find yourself on the north side of town, Anchored Coffee is a good bet).

It’s also just as easy to get an epic meal here, whatever your dietary preferences. It’s been a bit more challenging being a vegan in Coeur d’Alene, but watch for a blog post to come – I’m going to shed some light on the vegan scene in this lakeside town. Luckily I’ve found ways to tweak my favorite dishes at my go-to spots. You have to check out Fire Pizza downtown and order the Gordy Pizza. Just trust me. Don’t eat too much because the next morning you better get yourself over to Garnet Cafe for the most delicious locally-sourced breakfast you’ll find in town. Ask for a side of nutritional yeast and your taste buds will be singing. If you’re not vegan, try their amazing homemade lemon curd.

Downtown Farmers Market (August 2017) (66)The locavore within also loves the summer Farmer’s Market that runs from May until September. You’ll find the Saturday market in Hayden and the Wednesday evening market downtown, and both offer an impressive amount of local vendors selling their goods. Try the kombucha and the aebelskivers!

I could gush on and on about my favorite spots, but I’ll list a few more here and then move on…

Dining with a View: Beverley’s, Anthony’s, Dockside, Le Peep

Amazing Food: Syringa, 10-6, Wellness Bar, Moontime

For North Idaho Waterfront properties, visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

4) THE WILDLIFE IS DIVERSE AND PLENTIFUL

Now, humans certainly were not the first to discover the beauty of this area. The wildlife in Coeur d’Alene is breathtaking. My parents have turned into birdwatchers since moving here, and I’m ready to join them. We constantly ogle over bald eagles, osprey, great blue herons, loons, hummingbirds, geese, swans, hawks, sandpipers, mallards, robins, swallows, and a variety of other birds on the regular.CENTENNIAL TRAIL (4) It’s become a fun game to try and identify all of the different lake birds that pay us a visit. And aside from our winged friends, we have moose, elk, and deer that often wander dramatically across our lawn. If you haven’t seen a moose, MY GOSH, they’re huge and you should keep your distance – but they are breathtaking. We do have black bears and a few mountain lion sightings every year, so it isn’t recommended to go hiking alone. But generally, these large mountain critters keep to themselves.

It’s fun to explore the natural areas around Coeur d’Alene with a camera if you’re a wildlife enthusiast. If you think Pacific Northwest, you’re talking about elk and bears and moose – and we’ve got it! Right now (November and through winter) is the perfect time to spot bald eagles. I’m headed out this afternoon with a camera to try my luck.

For North Idaho Waterfront properties, visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

5) THE REST OF THE NORTHWEST IS NOT FAR!

I love that Coeur d’Alene is a bit tucked away from the hustle and bustle of Spokane and the farther hubs of Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, BOARDWALKetc…but if you want to go and explore any of those places, it’s only a half-day drive away (or a 45-minute plane ride). It’s very convenient having the Spokane Airport so close, and there’s also a train station in town or, of course, the good ole Greyhound. Your opportunities for adventure are endless if you decide you want to leave Coeur d’Alene (but why would you?). My favorite weekend getaways are Sandpoint, Idaho, and Whitefish, Montana, both cute towns with a lot of character and epic mountain/lake scenery. I recommend you go check those places out as well.

I sure hope I’ve convinced you to at least acknowledge Coeur d’Alene the next time you hear someone mention this weird-sounding place. I’m proud of my hometown and I hope you enjoyed reading about it!

Resort_Exterior_Aerial_Summer_2018 (23)Curious where the name comes from? The city is named after a tribe of Native Americans, called the Schitsu’umsh or “those who were found here,” who lived along the rivers and lakes of the region. The local people were encountered by French fur trappers in the late 18th and early 19th century, who gave them their French name. Coeur d’Alene means “heart of the awl,” possibly referring to the tough business practices of the Schitsu’umsh tribe (they were considered sharp-hearted and shrewd).

I love my hometown, and it will always be the best place to come home to.

For North Idaho Waterfront properties, visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com


Posted on October 21, 2019 at 5:07 am
Scott Shepard | Posted in Coeur d'Alene, Coeur d'Alene Resort, North Idaho Waterfront, Northern Idaho Destinations | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ten Surprising Attractions in Northern Idaho

Sometimes a lesser-known attraction ends up being a diamond in the rough.  We’ve listed some off-the-beaten-path Idaho favorites that deserve a look.  From chapels to memorials, wildlife to railways and hops to history, these special places contribute greatly to the fabric and experiences of northern Idaho.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Visit Beautiful Northern Idaho on Facebook

Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge.
Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge.

Wildlife enthusiasts or bird watchers shouldn’t miss a visit to the Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge near Bonners Ferry.  The refuge hosts more than 230 species of birds, 45 species of mammals, 22 species of fish and more scenery than can be absorbed in a day. The refuge lies along the Pacific Flyway, attracting tens of thousands of migrating ducks, geese and swans each fall. With luck, one may spot big game such as elk, deer, bear or moose. The refuge also has a system of foot trails, including Myrtle Falls trail. This well-maintained trail is winding and steep but the view of the falls makes the hike worthwhile. Also in the area, the McArthur Lake and Boundary Creek Wildlife Management Areas offer more wildlife viewing opportunities.

Mission of the Sacred Heart.
Mission of the Sacred Heart.

Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park in Cataldo is home to the oldest building in Idaho. The Mission of the Sacred Heart, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was constructed between 1850 and 1853 by Catholic missionaries and members of the Coeur d’ Alene Tribe. Guests may also see the restored Parish House and historic cemetery. The world-class Sacred Encounters Exhibit includes artifacts from the Smithsonian and Museum of Natural History and tells the story of how Jesuit missionaries came to the interior Northwest at the invitation of the Coeur d’ Alene and Salish tribes and the profound effects this sacred encounter had on both cultures.

 

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

The Bird Aviation Museum and Invention Center in Sagle showcases the contributions of aviators and innovators who have helped create modern technology and celebrates those individuals who have forever changed the way we live. The museum was founded by Dr. Forrest Bird, inventor of the medical respirator, and his wife Pam in 2007. Allow plenty of time to see Dr. Bird’s personal collection of aircraft, invention displays, and flight exhibits. Be inspired! It only takes one person to change the world.

A train funneled through Sandpoint follows the lakeshore.
A train funneled through Sandpoint follows the lakeshore.

Sandpoint Rail Funnel.  Sandpoint has the great honor to be the site where the east and westbound railways in the northern states converge, better known as a railway funnel. For train-spotters and railfans, Sandpoint is the place to be with more than 50 trains chugging through town daily. Railfans from around the world travel to Sandpoint to watch and photograph the trains, some more than a mile in length, as they traverse the bridge over Lake Pend Oreille and through the forested mountains.

Sunshine Mine Disaster Memorial
Sunshine Mine Disaster Memorial

To learn about northern

Idaho’s mining history, head to the towns of Wallace and Kellogg. The Wallace District Mining Museum’s artifacts, models, photographs, paintings and displays of mining activity and techniques take you back in time and deep into the history of one of the most lucrative mining districts in the country.  In Kellogg, the Shoshone County Mining & Smelting Museum or (Staff House Museum)  occupies a two-story American-revival style house constructed in 1906 for a mining company executive. It has 12 rooms of exhibits, a gift shop and outdoor displays including a 73.5 ton Nordberg air compressor. Learn about the human cost of extracting the earth’s riches with a visit to the Sunshine Mine Disaster Memorial in Kellogg.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Scenic Hiking Trails.  With the breathtaking scenery around Sandpoint, we are most fortunate to have hiking trails that offer access to some exceptional vistas. Bring a camera when hiking these two trails.

Mineral Point Interpretive Trail contours along Lake Pend Oreille about 14 miles south of Sandpoint near Garfield Bay with magnificent views across the lake to the Green Monarch Mountains. View the map and details at Forest Service Mineral Point Trail No. 82.

Views of the Green Monarch Mountains.
View of the Green Monarch Mountains.

One of the closest and nicest hikes adjacent to Sandpoint, the Mickinnick Trail is a challenging trail that rises more than 2,000 feet in its 3.5-mile length (seven miles round-trip). The workout is worth it, affording splendid views as you climb through big granite features ending at a rocky knob commanding a view of Sandpoint, the Long Bridge, the Cabinet Mountains, and Lake Pend Oreille. Click to see the Forest Service map and elevation profile.

Bonner County Historical Museum.
Bonner County Historical Museum.

The Bonner County Historical Museum in Sandpoint has numerous displays including Native American artifacts, an extensive collection of Ross Hall photos, a pioneer kitchen and more. Exhibits tell the story of the longest residents of Bonner County – the Kalispell and Kootenai people – and how early residents interacted with the landscape to make a living at farming, logging, and mining.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Elk Mountain Farms north of Bonners Ferry grows hops for parent company Anheuser-Busch. The intricate system of poles and trellises is impressive, as are the vines that grow 20 feet tall. Harvest is in late August to early September. To view the field, drive north on Highway 95 to Highway 1 and turn left on Copeland Road. Drive to the Westside Road and go south for outstanding views overlooking the fields. The operation can also be seen from Porthill.

The Panida Theater.
The Panida Theater.

Sandpoint’s historic performing arts center, the Spanish Mission style Panida Theater, has a rich winter season filled with concerts, plays, fine art films, and events. The Panida opened as a vaudeville and movie house in 1927 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Then, as now, its name reflected its mission: to showcase great performers and performances for audiences of the PANhandle of Idaho.

Discover the fascinating history of the Coeur d’Alene region at the Museum of North Idaho, located at the front of Coeur d’Alene’s City Park. Exhibits explore steamboats, railroads, communities, recreation, the U.S. Forest Service, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Farragut Naval Training Station, and the Ice Age Flood. Guests may also visit the Fort Sherman Chapel.  Built in 1880 by the U.S. Army, the chapel is Coeur d’Alene’s oldest church, school, library and meeting hall. Scheduled historic walking tours of Fort Sherman Chapel depart from the Museum.

Interested in moving to North Idaho? – Visit NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc

1616 E Seltice Way | Post Falls | ID | 83854

Original Article Appeared on VisitIdaho.Org

 

 


Posted on October 8, 2019 at 4:16 am
Scott Shepard | Posted in Coeur d'Alene History, Idaho Fun Facts, Idaho History, Northern Idaho Destinations | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Northern Idaho Waterfront – New Site For All North Idaho Waterfront Properties

Experience all of the beauty Northern Idaho has to offer! One of the premier vacation destinations in the US, North Idaho is attracting tourists from all parts of the world looking to vacation among the vast trees, lakes, rivers, and wildlife. Because of this, right now is the perfect time to invest in in-demand, waterfront property.

Our team is excited to launch NorthIdahoWaterfront.com, an easy to use site featuring premier waterfront properties. Updated by the official Realtor®’s database every 5 minutes.  NorthIdahoWaterfront.com features the best lakefront, river frontage properties and waterfront lots available in Northern Idaho. It is the only site you will ever need!  You can save searches, and get daily email alerts of new listings, price changes, sold data, and market reports. Our Interactive Map Search allows you to view properties on a map or refine your search by drawing the boundaries around the area you desire.

—– Visit www.NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

Once you find your utopia, please allow us to help you with the next steps.  You will have a hand-selected team of all-star agents, with years of experience, that will represent you on your waterfront purchase. Behind our talented team is Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc.  Proud to have received numerous awards over the years including the Northwest Business Journal’s “Best Of” Real Estate Office awards for the last 8 years!

In addition, when you work with our team, you help make an impact in children’s lives!  Every time you complete a transaction with Windermere, we make a donation to the Windermere Foundation.

Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc., and Windermere Hayden, LLC have made a sincere commitment to improving the lives of children, families, and neighbors in crisis through their volunteerism, monetary gifts, and the Windermere Foundation.

Thank you for visiting NorthIdahoWaterfront.com

 

 

 


Posted on October 6, 2019 at 5:23 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in Coeur d'Alene, North Idaho Waterfront, Northern Idaho Destinations, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Beautiful Coeur d’Alene Resort

Coeur d'Alene Resort

The Coeur d’Alene Resort is a luxury resort hotel in the northwest United States, located in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Seated on the north shore of Lake Coeur d’Alene by Tubbs Hill, the resort features a marina, convention facilities, spa, as well as a notable 18-hole golf course.

The hotel has 338 rooms and suites, and its main tower has 18 floors. At 216 feet (66 m), it is the tallest building in Northern Idaho and the third-highest in the state.

The “North Shore Resort” opened 54 years ago in 1965 and completed its seven-story tower in 1973; it was acquired by Hagadone Hospitality in June 1983 in a takeover of Western Frontiers, Inc.  Duane Hagadone soon announced plans for resort expansion, and the North Shore closed on New Year’s Day in 1986 for several months; it reopened in the spring with a new name: “The Coeur d’Alene: A Resort on the Lake.  The new 18-story addition, known as the Lake Tower, was built by Hagadone and Jerry Jaeger and opened 33 years ago in May 1986.  Designed by architect R.G. Nelson, the hotel features a 0.75-mile (1.2 km) floating boardwalk around the marina. Considered the longest floating boardwalk in the world.

—Search for Coeur d’Alene Waterfront Homes Near Resort—

The golf course is about a mile east (1.6 km) of the resort and was originally the site of the Rutledge sawmill,  which operated from 1916 to 1987, closing on October 31.  The Hagadone Corporation bought the property from Potlatch Corporation in March 1988 via a three-way land swap, and its buildings were allowed to be burned in June; local fire departments used it as a training exercise.

The golf course and the floating green were developed, and the course opened for play 28 years ago in 1991.  Its construction required environmental clean-up of the debris left from the lumber industry and had stalled in August 1988.  With environmental concerns allayed, the project was well-received in January and course construction began in 1989.

—Search for Coeur d’Alene Waterfront Homes Near Resort—

The seven-story Park Tower (1973), completed a renovation in 2000,  as did the signature Lake Tower (1986) in 2006.

Helpful Resort Resources:

Coeur d’Alene News

Recent Coeur d’Alene Resort Renovations 

Coeur d’Alene Resort Wiki

Coeur d’Alene Golf – The Floating Green

 

Interested in buying in Coeur d’Alene?

Scott Shepard

Realtor | SP49359

Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty, Inc.

Direct: (208) 797.0633

ScottS@Windermere.com

 

 

 

 


Posted on October 4, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in Coeur d'Alene, Coeur d'Alene Resort, North Idaho Waterfront, Northern Idaho Destinations |

Top 3 Ski Resorts in Northern Idaho

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT

High above scenic Sandpoint, Idaho, in the Selkirk Mountains, Schweitzer Mountain Resort offers a variety of terrain for all skill levels – from smooth, corduroy groomers to wide-open bowls and tree-lined runs. And with lodging, food, and shops in Schweitzer Village, you’ll find all the ski-in, ski-out excitement your family craves. Or, just a short drive down the mountain, there’s even more fun to be had in the heart of downtown Sandpoint.

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS ON SCHWEITZER

LOOKOUT PASS SKI RESORT

In the sea of voices claiming to have the best snow, Lookout is legit, providing the easiest access to over 400 inches of powder per year – powder that’s perfect for skiers and riders of all ages and abilities. Their family-friendly reputation is backed by their famous Free Ski School for kids, while they also offer lessons and programs for people of all skill levels. And if you and your family decide to stay and play a little longer, Lookout is surrounded by lodging options, from hotels & motels to B&Bs and camping facilities.

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS ON LOOKOUT PASS

SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT

This year-round resort in Kellogg, Idaho, offers something for every season. Tons of trails, open bowls and off-piste terrain open for skiing and snowboarding of all skill levels in the winter. Then when the snow melts, the region’s best lift-served bike park comes to life and lets you send it all summer long, not to mention gondola rides, hiking and surfing at Idaho’s largest indoor water park. There’s also plenty of lodging in the heart of the gondola village along with family-friendly entertainment and enough dining options to satisfy every appetite.

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS ON SILVER MOUNTAIN


Posted on September 18, 2019 at 7:46 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in Coeur d'Alene, Northern Idaho Destinations, Uncategorized |

15 Things You Might Not Know About Idaho

1. Idaho’s known for its potatoes, but its official nickname is the Gem State. Some 72 different precious and semi-precious gemstones have been found there.

2. One of them is the star garnet. It’s only found in abundance in two places in the world: Idaho and India.

3. Idaho also supplies the majority of the nation’s trout.

Idaho

Welcome to Idaho

4. Wondering how the state got its name? So are its residents, as a number of sources claim the name’s provenance. Lobbyist George Willing alleged Idaho meant “gem of the mountains” or “the sun comes from the mountains” in the Shoshone language. Others said the name came from the Apache word “ídaahę́,” meaning enemy, or a Nez Perce phrase that translates to “land of many waters.” Willing eventually copped that he totally made up the word “Idaho.”

5. In 1861, Idaho wasn’t even called Idaho. Originally, Congress dubbed the land the Colorado Territory. Idaho finally became a territory all its own in 1863 and became the 43rd state in 1890.

6. The state horse, the Appaloosa, was brought over by the Spaniards in the 1700s and embraced by the Nez Perce tribe. Settlers called the spotted equines “Palouse horses” after the Palouse River, and the name stuck.

7. At 7,993 feet deep, Hells Canyon in western Idaho is the deepest river gorge in North America. In comparison, the Grand Canyon is only 6,000 feet deep.

Thinking of moving to Idaho?  Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty

8. Thirteen U.S. states are split into two time zones, and Idaho’s one of them. The majority of the state’s area and population fall under Mountain Time. The area above the Salmon River is part of the Pacific Time Zone.

9. Idaho’s state seal is the only one in the U.S. designed by a woman. Emma Edwards Green entered a statewide competition for the honor in 1891 by using only her initials.

10. Also impressive: Idaho’s State Capitol Building is the only one in the U.S. heated by geothermal energy. The heat comes from hot springs located 3,000 feet underground.

11. Idaho’s most famous crop (the potato) isn’t native to the area. The first potato in America was actually planted in New Hampshire, in 1719. A missionary named Henry Harmon Spalding brought the potato to Lapwai, Idaho, in 1836 to teach the Nez Perce tribe how to grow their own food. They were the first to cultivate and sell spuds in the area.

12. If you’re curious whether someone’s from Idaho, try asking him or her to pronounce “Boise.” Natives and longtime residents tend to pronounce it “boy-see,” while outsiders usually say “boy-zee.”

Thinking of moving to Idaho?  Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty

13. Firefighters call this axe-like tool a Pulaski, after the Idahoan forest ranger who popularized it. Edward Pulaski was a hero of the Great Idaho Fire of 1910, which spanned three million acres, killed 87 people, and remains the largest wildfire in U.S. history. He led 45 firefighters to an abandoned prospect mine and fought off the flames at its mouth until he passed out, saving all but five men. A year after the disaster, Pulaski combined an axe and an adze to create the perfect tool for building firebreaks.

14. If you’re dog tired and traveling through Cottonwood, Idaho, you can spend the night at Dog Bark Park Inn, a bed and breakfast shaped like a giant beagle.

15. Or, here’s an even bigger adventure: Sail from the Pacific Ocean to Idaho (or vice-versa) via the Snake and Columbia Rivers. You’ll finish (or start) in Lewiston, the farthest inland port on the west coast.

Thinking of moving to Idaho?  Windermere Coeur d’Alene Realty

Original article by Amanda Green


Posted on September 16, 2019 at 9:02 pm
Scott Shepard | Posted in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Fun Facts | Tagged , , , , ,